Regional Specialties

Regional Specialties

Miso-Katsu-Don (Nagoya-Style Miso Katsu Rice Bowl)

Katsu-Don (Tonkatsu and Egg Rice Bowl) is definitely one of the most popular kind of Donburi (rice bowl) dishes in Japan and is a very typical but excellent way to consume day-old Tonkastu. And Nagoya Aichi has proudly got its own version of Katsu-Don using its iconic Miso-based Tonkatsu sauce. Gosh, words just can't describe how good Miso-Katsu-Don is. Find it out for yourself!
Regional Specialties

Miso Katsu (Deep Fried Breaded Pork Cutlet with Red Miso Sauce)

Tonkatsu, aka Katsu, is one of the most popular comfort foods in Japan and loved by people of all ages. Because of the ...
Regional Specialties

Goya-Champuru (Okinawa-Style Stir-fried Bitter Melon) Ver.2

This is the version 2 of my Goya-Champuru recipe. The notable difference between the first one and this is that I used pork belly instead of spam so that you can taste more umami from pork, and the use of Kokuto (brown sugar) from Okinawa, which is a secret technique that non-Okinawa people rarely know. The brown sugar does not only help tone down the bitterness of Goya but adds profoundness to the dish as well. Enjoy!
Regional Specialties

Mizutaki (Hakata-Style Chicken Hot Pot)

Mizutaki is a type of hot pot originated in Hakata, Kyushu. Although the dish was born in Japan, you can call it a fusion of Chinese, western and Japanese cuisines. This is because Heizaburo Hayashida, who is said to be the inventor of the dish and lived in Hong Kong learning to become a chef, got inspired by Consommé a Chinese chicken stew, and created Mizutaki when he came back to Kyushu.
Regional Specialties

Imomochi (Hokkaido-Style Potato Cake)

The origin of Imo-Mochi dates back to late 1800's, when exploration of Hokkaido island started in earnest. Unfortunately, at that time, rice was barely cultivated on the island and Mochi, rice cake, could not be made. Therefore they used potatoes, which were abundant on the island, to make an alternative. Imo-Mochi was an important source of protein and carbohydrate for the pioneers to survive the severe climate and heavy physical labor. Today it has become one of the snack icons of Hokkaido and is enjoyed by many locals and tourists.
Ramen

Authentic Sapporo-Style Miso Ramen

Sapporo Miso Ramen would probably be the most recognised type of ramen in the Hokkaido ramen variety. Since the first Miso ramen in Japanese history made its appearance in Sapporo in1955, the city is regarded as the one of the birth places of Miso Ramen. It’s rich and profound Miso soup, crunch of the vegetables and the iconic bouncy texture of the noodles complement each other to form one of the most unforgettable bowls of ramen which is a perfect dish to warm you up during severe winter.
Regional Specialties

Negi-Ma Nabe (Tokyo’s Tuna and Green Onion Hot Pot)

Negi-Ma Nabe is a hotpot with tuna and green onion enjoyed in Tokyo since 1800's. "Negi" is translated as green onion o...
Regional Specialties

Takana-Chahan (Pickled Mustard Green Fried Rice)

Takana-Chahan is a simple and rustic fried rice with Takana (pickled mustard green from Kyushu island) and one of the Yatai (a Japanese food cart) dishes in Kumamoto prefecture. When Takana is fried, its umami gets fully boosted and brings such a depth to the dish. You can enjoy Takana-Chahan just as it is, which make a perfect lunch, or on the side of Kumamoto’s famous Tonkotsu ramen!!
Regional Specialties

Dashi (Yamagata-style Vegetable Tartare)

This is very different from the Dashi, Japanese fish or seaweed stock, that you would probably associate with. The Dashi I am talking about here is a one of the iconic specialty dishes from Yamagata prefecture.
Regional Specialties

Ishikari Jiru(Hokkaido’s Traditional Salmon Miso Soup)

Ishikari Jiru, I would say, is a "Bowlful of Hokkaido". The word Ishikari refers to the name of the region where the dish originated and "Jiru" means soup. The dish has Hokkaido's local produce, such as potatoes, onion, carrots, daikon and so on, and most importantly, locally caught salmon.
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